Still Here.

flynn hi

Yup, I’m still here. Been dealing with crappy issues over the past months, so I haven’t been doing much of note. I’m on a self-imposed writing hiatus until the new year. Hoping the break does me good.

But you can’t turn off a writer’s brain, so my hiatus hasn’t stopped me from brainstorming about Narrator and other projects. Specifically a paranormal police procedural series I want to do after Narrator. (The Supernatural-inspired one mentioned here. Figured out how to serialize it. BTW, that anthology never went anywhere because of aforementioned crappy issues.)

Anyway, this is where I send out a call for reading recommendations! I want to read paranormal police procedurals to see a) what’s been done, and b) how other authors did it.

What’s a paranormal police procedural? Think iZombie. Assistant ME who’s a zombie and uses her zombie powers to help a police detective solve murders. I’m looking for that kind of thing, not private investigator stuff. (So no Dresden Files. I’ve already read some of those, not what I want.)

So: who has suggestions? I will give you virtual chocolate chip cookies. Not actual chocolate chip cookies, I hate baking. I could buy you cookies, I suppose…maybe if I really liked what you suggested…


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.

And Now for Something Completely Different

keith-margos-murder-mystery-dinner-at-matteos-los-angeles-caI hate to admit it, but I think I need a break from Narrator. I haven’t written at all in the past few weeks, and I need to write something or I will explode. SO. I’ve decided to write an anthology of three murder mystery short stories. I’m hoping that writing this will help me in the Narrator department as well.

All of the stories will be fantasy (of course). Two of them will be related to series I want to write after Narrator. The first is set in an alternative 1910* England, where magic has been outlawed. I’ve already got a great mystery lined up for it. The second is a little murkier since my plans for this series have undergone many iterations over the years, so that’s definitely in the TBD category.

The third short story isn’t based on a future series, unless I want to turn it into one. It’s an off-shoot of the Supernatural fanfic I’ve been playing in my head these last few weeks. I specifically designed this “episode” to not rely on the Supernatural mythology so that I could easily turn it into an original piece. Again, great mystery lined up, if I do say so myself.

Now, why murder mysteries? I enjoy them, but never thought of writing one. Then when you consider that the Supernatural-inspired story is already a murder mystery, and my 1910 series is already a thriller/mystery series, the common thread is plain enough.

I’m also going to try putting my new technique idea into practice. Scrivener has a “screenplay” mode. My theory is that a) it will be easier to let the action flow, and b) it’ll help me curb my tendency to expand the crap out of my plot. Seriously, I always get stampeded by subplots. It’s ridiculous. So sticking to a 45-60 page screenplay should nip that in the bud, right?

Hopefully working on this anthology will begin to allow me to work on Narrator again, and I’ll just switch back and forth for a while. Wish me luck! *crosses fingers*

 

* What? No, I didn’t set it in 1910 so that a few books down the road I could set one on the Titanic. Why would you think such a thing?


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.

How to Break Writer’s Block

cameraOnce you admit that you listen to the voices in your head and write out what they’re saying (aka that you’re a writer), the inevitable question is: where do you get your ideas?

Most writers will facetiously-yet-sincerely reply, “Everything.”

Because getting ideas isn’t the hard part. Not the initial ones you’re thinking of, anyway. The hard part is when you’re mired in the middle of your novel, with no idea how to get your characters out of the mess you made for them. When you go to write and your mind is a complete blank.

Now, there are tons of ways to get the juices flowing again. You’ll find advice everywhere, from amateur and experienced alike. It really just comes down to the individual author. The method that usually works for me is a stream-of-consciousness brainstorm. I basically write out a conversation with my Muse, tossing ideas back and forth. Alternatively, I do the whole “do a rote activity and let your brain churn in the background.”

But sometimes, like over the last few weeks, neither of those methods work.

Now, you probably don’t remember, unless you creepily remember everything I post on social media, but several weeks ago I had a really cool Supernatural-inspired dream. And I woke up before I found out what happened next. So, being the cool person I am, I decided to find out by continuing the story. Ever since that dream, I’ve been running the story in my head, creating new monsters of the week and even establishing a season-long arc. (Over-achiever, much?)

It’s been pretty great, watching the story unfold. Even better, I found that it’s a fun way to pass the time during otherwise boring activities, like my commute or daily walk. I throw different situations at the characters and let them react however they want — and since the characters are so well defined, it’s pretty easy to set on auto-pilot. Everything just flows so seamlessly.

The other day, I realized I should try this with Narrator.

I had one troublesome scene where I only vaguely knew what I wanted to happen. I’d managed to figure out things up to a certain point, but anything past that was just wide brushstrokes. So I started at that point and encouraged Calder and the others to play it out like they were in a movie. No delving into thoughts or anything, they just needed to be actors for a while.

That immediately made the action flow better, and I just let the story unfold the same way I let my Supernatural fanfic unfold. I did have to “rewind” a couple of times to fix some logic or increase the tension, but that wasn’t too difficult.

And it worked!

I was able to see how the situation played out, in a way that made sense, and I got some great ideas. And I mean some great ideas. I wanted to take a picture of my notes in triumph, but if you managed to read my chicken scratch you’d unwittingly see spoilers. (Sucks to be you, I guess.)

Anyway, this particular writer’s block seems to have broken. The next hurdle is going to be trying to write everything down and hope the Muse doesn’t make a sharp left turn and throw all of this under the bus. *crosses fingers*


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.

Fun Fact: Train of Thought

Inside-Out-Train-of-Thought-HeadquartersBefore middle school, I didn’t think in words. I know, I’m a writer, how can I not think in words? But so it was. I thought in pictures, emotions, abstract thought — basically anything that wasn’t a word.

But in middle school, I began to notice how book characters’ thoughts were written. For example, “Wouldn’t it be cool if a train of thought was steam-powered, she thought.” This type of structure made me believe that other people thought in words, and that there was something wrong with me because I didn’t.

So what did my impressionable young self do? Trained myself to think in words.

In retrospect, I wish I hadn’t done that. I feel like I’ve limited myself for no good reason. Lately I’ve been trying to encourage my old thinking process, to hopefully reach a more balanced stream of consciousness. But I have no idea what effect that would have on something like my writing. So I guess we’ll see how it goes.


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.

It’s Not Going at All, Thank You

Remember when I listed 10 Things Not to Say to a Writer? Here’s #11: How’s your novel going?

stitch-frustrated


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.

Inspiration: Bea Miller

Not-An-Apology-250x250I have never encountered an artist where I love every single one of their songs. Usually I love a few songs, like a few others, and don’t really care about the rest.

But then Pandora introduced me to Bea Miller. After a while, I realized that I was thumbing-up every song of hers that played. Pretty unusual. (I started a Bea Miller station, hoping to find similar artists, but the songs Pandora threw at me were…well…not similar. Oh well.)

I seriously love all of her songs. I can’t even pick a favorite. When I try, the conversation ends up going like this: “I Dare You. That’s my favorite.” “Oh, but I love Enemy Fire. That’s my favorite.” “No, wait! I forgot about Fire N Gold. That. That’s my favorite!” (etc. etc. etc.)

And for the first time in forever, I bought an album. (Yes, the last one I bought was the Frozen soundtrack. How could you tell?) I didn’t just buy the album digitally either, I bought the actual CD so I can listen to it in the car. I also bought Open Your Eyes, which was on Pandora but wasn’t in the album.

I’ve been listening to Bea while I write, while I exercise…heck, I’m 99.9% sure I listened to it on the train this morning. (I wrote this post in advance, as I am wont to do.) I’m sure I’ll get sick of it sooner or later. I’m betting later.

So yeah, I invite you to take a listen. Let me know if you like her songs, too!

Update: Yes, I listened to her on the metro. And then when I got to work and switched to Pandora, she was the first one to play. ;D

Disclaimer: the links to Amazon are affiliate links. If you buy stuff, I get a few measly cents. Just so you know. 🙂


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.

Oh Yay!

When a reader tells me they will always ship my favorite in-story couple:
200
(True story.)


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.

Whoa

When you finally put the last pieces together and realize what your Muse has been trying to tell you all along:
ron


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.

Writing on a Depression Seesaw

A_dog_plays_on_a_seesaw_with_children_in_Scotland,Back from Hawaii and the jet lag is kicking my butt. I was awake in the 1:30 to 4 am range, woke up at 9, meant to sleep in a little longer…and next thing I know it’s 1 pm. Whoops.

What’s really annoying, however, is this writing seesaw I seem to be on. If you’ve been following me on Twitter, you’ve seen this for yourself. I’ll have an amazingly awesome day, like when I wrote a little over 2,500 words, followed by an absolute crap day where I write 0 words (and maybe throw out what I did write yesterday, so now it’s going into the negative).

And it’s not just about word count, or progress. My mood is significantly better on a good writing day. And my mood gets flushed down the toilet on a bad writing day. But saying it like that confuses the cause and effect: my mood dictates how I write. Sure, how I write feeds back into my mood, but it starts with mood.

So it takes twice as long to get anything done, because I can’t get anything done on a bad day. I just sit around and watch Netflix. And the bad days are way worse after getting seesaw’d from a good day, because I want to keep writing and keep up my momentum, but I’ve just plunged from one extreme to the other.

And since I’m writing this on a bad day (Sunday), that’s about all I’ve got. I’m just hoping that Monday will be a good day.


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.

My Week in GIFs

After writing over 2,500 words in one day:
tangled_best_day_ever

And then, realizing I had to throw out almost 1,000 of those words because I’d gone in the wrong direction AGAIN:
buffy_sad

And then, having a friend help me figure out how to keep most of what I’d written (and only throw out 372 words):
relief

So, you know…nothing new.


Jennifer A. Johnson is a newly published fantasy writer thanks to The Adventure of Creation anthology. She's still revising her first novel, but you can sign up for her free newsletter to pass the time.